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At UN Conference, ubiquitous AIDS meme spread around world by media


With still no vaccine available, only pockets of sanity remain

Though testing has yet to confirm it for every case, it is now believed that the AIDS meme in the past decade has infected 100% of international organisations such as UNAIDS, UNICEF, and WHO, as well all activist NGOs in the field, the media who cover them, and nearly all the governments of the world, with the sole exception of the South African government led by Thabo Mbeki, who apparently is one of the rare politicians, possibly unique, who has a natural immunity to putting the welfare of his people in the hands of the well paid practitioners of modern Western medical science if their possibly mistaken and self-serving claims don’t add up in terms of common sense.

Now this week’s government level gathering at the UN of all these institutional victims of the HIV=AIDS meme has resulted in their unwittingly fueling an unprecedented surge of the HIV?AIDS infopandemic around the world, media coverage of the UN conference this week shows.

It has been known for some time that the original media victim of the HIV=AIDS meme was none other than Larry K. Altman MD himself, the medical correspondent of the New York Times, who was apparently infected on or about April 23, 1984. The effect of the meme was to wipe out all the critical acumen in the worthy Altman’s brain, so that when presented with the dictum “We have discovered the probable cause of AIDS” by Margaret Heckler at the famous press conference that day featuring the dashing Robert Gallo in aviator glasses, the mentally paralyzed Altman was unable to ask the obvious question, why HIV, which only occurred in one third of the patient blood samples, and not, if any virus, cytomegalovirus, which could be detected in 97%?

The brain crippling meme subsequently spread through the entire staff of the Times, it is now clear, since the many objections to the HIV ideology which have been repeatedly published in the scientific and lay literature since have never been properly reported, let alone examined, by anyone at the Times, even though they are visible to many without scientific or medical training in the public at large. Such people apparently also have the rare natural immunity to overeaching and self serving claims by modern scientists, especially those wearing aviator spectacles.

Possibly to their everlasting embarrassment, if a vaccine against the meme is ever found, those at the Times taken over by the paralyzing mental microbe include even Nicholas Wade and Philip Hilts, previously distinguished reporters and critics of science who co-authored “Betrayers of the Truth”, a book which warned of the capacity of scientists to try and pull the wool over the eyes of the public and the politicians who might fund their work.

But since then the meme has evidently spread throughout the media, though as yet reporters are rarely tested, owing to the expense, and it is a rare publication in any country that has any resistance at all to the spreading infopandemic. With the refinement of satellite communication technology and the Web it is now known that the media reporters themselves have been and are primarily responsible for the unprecedented rate of new infections around the world in recent years.

While media coverage at the Times and elsewhere of the UN meeting this week shows that the AIDS meme is claiming millions of new victims annually, and may well infect virtually the entire population of the world by the year 2020, the coverage itself this week is believed to have already contributed to a new surge.

At the Times, Larry Altman and Elizabeth Rosenthal have rolled over for the mainstream HIV?AIDS global pandemic narrative all week, culminating in today’s report, UN Strengthens Call for a Global Battle Against AIDS. This report in the usual slavish Altman manner simply repeats the press conference claims of the UN spokesmen during the week, sometimes almost drawn verbatim from the UN press releases:

In the 25 years since the first case was discovered, AIDS has become one of the worst pandemics in history, infecting 60 million people and leading to 25 million deaths.

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The New York Times

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June 3, 2006

U.N. Strengthens Call for a Global Battle Against AIDS

By LAWRENCE K. ALTMAN and ELISABETH ROSENTHAL

UNITED NATIONS, June 2 — The General Assembly adopted a strongly worded declaration on Friday aimed at pressing the nations of the world to strengthen their battle against AIDS, a global pandemic that Secretary General Kofi Annan called “the greatest challenge of our generation.”

The language of the document surprised even anti-AIDS groups, which said that while it did not satisfy all their objectives, they had feared it would be watered down. In turn, United Nations officials credited the advocacy groups for strengthening the draft in behind-the-scenes struggles during an extraordinary three-day plenary session.

The nonbinding declaration reaffirms commitments made in 2001, when the United Nations defined AIDS as far more than a medical issue, framing it in terms of politics, human rights and economic survival.

At the time, few felt that effective delivery of the antiretroviral therapy now provided to some people in poor countries was possible, and there was little money for the program.

The new document is a political blueprint, not a plan of action. It calls for a strong commitments to bolster the rights of women and girls so they can protect themselves from infection with H.I.V., the virus that causes AIDS. The document also acknowledges the role of men in spreading the disease and their responsibility to respect women.

The declaration calls on countries to use scientifically documented prevention strategies, including condoms; to make clean needles accessible to drug users; and to take steps to provide universal access to prevention programs, care and antiretroviral drugs.

It includes politically charged terms like “condoms” and “vulnerable groups,” though those groups are not specified. Many advocates have urged the United Nations to acknowledge frankly that some of today’s fastest-growing H.I.V. epidemics are among intravenous drug users, prostitutes and gay men.

Countries will be expected to measure their progress over the next five years against targets to be determined by the United Nations.

To achieve these and other goals, the declaration said, the world will need to spend up to $23 billion a year by 2010, almost triple the $8.3 billion spent last year. The challenge is for governments to follow through after delegates go home, the General Assembly’s president, Ian Eliasson of Sweden, said at a news conference.

In the 25 years since the first case was discovered, AIDS has become one of the worst pandemics in history, infecting 60 million people and leading to 25 million deaths.

Earlier in the day, Mr. Annan delivered a gloomy assessment, saying the world was losing the battle.

“The epidemic continues to outpace us,” he told a packed session of the General Assembly. “There are more new infections than ever before; more deaths than ever before; more women and girls infected than ever before.”

His dark tone diverged markedly from the upbeat speeches by world leaders at the start of the three-day session on Wednesday, and from the positive speech given Friday morning by Laura Bush, the first lady.

Mrs. Bush said the United States contributed more money than any other country to fight AIDS, which “respects no national boundaries; spares no race or religion; and devastates men and women, rich and poor alike.”

Mrs. Bush noted that her husband had put forth a plan in 2003 that contributes $15 billion over five years to fight AIDS internationally.

Her speech steered away from many of the criticisms that have been leveled against the administration, notably that it promotes sexual abstinence over scientifically proven strategies, particularly condom use. Indeed, she said, the “ABC” model — the initials stand for abstain, be faithful and use condoms — had brought sharp declines in infections in Africa.

Britain’s secretary of state for international development, Hilary Benn, noting policy differences between his country and the United States, said in an interview that abstinence alone did not work.

Mr. Benn, whose country contributes the second-largest amount to fight AIDS, criticized the declaration for not spelling out the ways the virus is transmitted through sex and through contaminated needles used to inject drugs, and from mother to infant through birth and nursing.

“Abstinence is fine for those who are able to abstain, but human beings like to have sex and they should not die because they do have sex,” Mr. Benn told the assembly.

Dr. Mark Dybul, the acting United States global AIDS coordinator, said in an interview that the United Nations had passed “a fine declaration” in which he had not found any weak points.

Adrienne Germain, president of the International Women’s Health Coalition, said the document could be used “to make significant progress in going forward” in the fight.

But some advocacy groups said the document did not satisfy all their objectives.

The Center for Health and Gender Equity, which says it represents nearly 70 international advocacy groups, denounced the document for failing to show greater political leadership; refusing to make a commitment to more definitive targets on financing, prevention, care and treatment; and rejecting frank acknowledgment that some of today’s fastest-growing epidemics are occurring among injecting drug users, prostitutes and gay men.

Dr. Peter Piot, the executive director of the United Nations program, said that while no document could make anyone “100 percent happy,” the final version was “a major advance” and far stronger than the weaker drafts circulating earlier in the week.

Another of the leading media victims of the AIDS meme is CBS, its critical resistance to the stories of officialdom once extremely high, especially at Sixty Minutes, but in the aftermath of the Dan Rather debacle, weakened to the point where it is now completely wiped out by the brain invading virus.

Thus in the following report, CBS News correspondent Elizabeth Kaledin’s frequent recognition in her story that the claims of her sources in HIV?AIDS are “incredible”, “hard to believe” etc is apparently only a reflex left over from earlier eras, without connection to the active frontal cortex. The defensive brain cells that normally fight off invading memes, helped by the medicating doses of skepticism freely available earlier at Black Rock, are apparently helpless in the face of the viral onslaught.

The latest statistics show that in the United States, there are 40,000 new HIV infections every year. Incredibly, that number has not changed in a decade…

Powerful drugs have enabled people to live longer. But there are still about 15,000 AIDS deaths every year.

The fastest-growing group getting infected? Heterosexual women like Dawn Averitt Bridge, who now make up 27 percent of new cases…

“The idea that there aren’t positive women out there …. there are probably 300,000 to 400,000 women in this country living with the disease,” says Averitt Bridge, who was diagnosed with HIV in 1988…

Today, Averitt Bridge runs the Well Project, a group for HIV-positive women. She’s managed to live a full, healthy life, even raising two daughters. But she worries that the American infection rate will remain high.

“We are afraid to talk about HIV,” she says. “We’re afraid that somehow we’re going to own HIV if we talk about it. It’s the elephant in the room in so many settings — and unfortunately we have a long, long way to go.”

That can be hard to believe after 25 years and a disease that has claimed 25 million lives.

Slow Progress In Fight Vs. AIDS – 25 Years After First Cases Found, Global Scourge Shows No Signs Of Abating

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Print ThisGo BackGo to CBSNews.com Home

Slow Progress In Fight Vs. AIDS

June 2, 2006(CBS) Twenty-five years ago, the first newspaper headlines documented a medical mystery: 41 cases of a rare cancer seen only in gay men. Who could have known that this was the beginning of the AIDS epidemic? Now, says CBS News correspondent Elizabeth Kaledin, AIDS and the virus that causes it, HIV, are a global scourge.

On Friday, the United Nations concluded its High-Level Meeting on AIDS, a three-day gathering designed to hammer out better strategies for slowing a seemingly never-ending tide of infections — now numbering 40 million worldwide.

A full quarter-century after the first cases were discovered, meetings about AIDS ignite protest and controversy. Few diseases, if any, remain so emotionally and politically charged.

In the United States, doctors like Jay Levy, who has followed the spread of AIDS from the beginning, fear that Americans, especially young Americans, just don’t care.

“What is wrong is that out best vaccine, which is education, is not working,” he says.

The latest statistics show that in the United States, there are 40,000 new HIV infections every year. Incredibly, that number has not changed in a decade.

Powerful drugs have enabled people to live longer. But there are still about 15,000 AIDS deaths every year.

The fastest-growing group getting infected? Heterosexual women like Dawn Averitt Bridge, who now make up 27 percent of new cases.

“The idea that there aren’t positive women out there …. there are probably 300,000 to 400,000 women in this country living with the disease,” says Averitt Bridge, who was diagnosed with HIV in 1988.

Today, Averitt Bridge runs the Well Project, a group for HIV-positive women. She’s managed to live a full, healthy life, even raising two daughters. But she worries that the American infection rate will remain high.

“We are afraid to talk about HIV,” she says. “We’re afraid that somehow we’re going to own HIV if we talk about it. It’s the elephant in the room in so many settings — and unfortunately we have a long, long way to go.”

That can be hard to believe after 25 years and a disease that has claimed 25 million lives.©MMVI, CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. Feedback Terms of Service Privacy Statement

Thus the 60 Minutes level CBS immunity to nonsense from official sources, weakened by the Rather mess, is deactivated by the AIDS meme, which allows free access to the interior of the mind without any resistance beyond feeble semi-conscious cries of “It seems incredible but” and “Hard to believe but”.

Other major media victims reduced to mental paralysis and abject servility in the face of the meme attack include AP and Forbes, which reproduce the meme’s genetic makeup in multiple copies without a single strand of caution in AIDS’ Next 25 Years May Be Worse for Africa By Terry Leonard :

It began innocuously, when a statistical anomaly pointed to a mysterious syndrome that attacked the immune systems of gay men in California. No one imagined 25 years ago that AIDS would become the deadliest epidemic in history….

“It is the worst and deadliest epidemic that humankind has ever experienced,” Mark Stirling, the director of East and Southern Africa for UNAIDS, said in an interview.

More effective medicines, better access to treatment and improved prevention in the last few years have started to lower the grim projections. But even if new infections stopped immediately, additional African deaths alone would exceed 40 million, Stirling said.

“We will be grappling with AIDS for the next 10, 20, 30, 50 years,” he said….

Besides the personal suffering of the infected and their families, the epidemic already has had devastating consequences for African education systems, industry, agriculture and economies in general. The impact is magnified because AIDS weakens and kills many young adults, people in their most productive years.

So many farmers and farmworkers have died of AIDS that the U.N. has invented the term “new variant famine.” It means that because of AIDS, the continent will experience persistent famine for generations instead of the usual cycles of hunger tied to variable weather…

Nobody knows for sure when or where, but the AIDS epidemic is thought to have begun in the primeval forests of West Africa when a virus lurking in the blood of a monkey or a chimpanzee made the leap from one species to another, infecting a hunter.

Researchers have found HIV in a blood sample collected in 1959 from a man in Kinshasa, Congo. Genetic analysis of his blood suggested the HIV infection stemmed from a single virus in the late 1940s or early 1950s.

For decades at least, the early human infections went unnoticed on a continent where life routinely is harsh, short and cheap…

“There is evidence to suggest we are at the tipping point,” said Stirling.

The pace of change over the last couple of years suggests the number of new infections can be reduced by 50 to 60 percent by 2020 – if the momentum continues.

“It is surely possible, it is doable,” Stirling said.

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Associated Press

AIDS’ Next 25 Years May Be Worse for Africa

By TERRY LEONARD , 06.02.2006, 03:35 PM

It began innocuously, when a statistical anomaly pointed to a mysterious syndrome that attacked the immune systems of gay men in California. No one imagined 25 years ago that AIDS would become the deadliest epidemic in history.

Since June 5, 1981, HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, has killed more than 25 million people, infected 40 million others and left a legacy of unspeakable loss, hardship, fear and despair.

Its spread was hastened by ignorance, prejudice, denial and the freedoms of the sexual revolution. Along the way from oddity to pandemic, AIDS changed they way people live and love.

Slowed but unchecked, the epidemic’s relentless march has established footholds in the world’s most populous countries. Advances in medicine and prevention that have made the disease manageable in the developed world haven’t reach the rest.

In the worst case, sub-Saharan Africa, it has been devastating. And the next 25 years of AIDS promise to be deadlier than the first.

AIDS could kill 31 million people in India and 18 million in China by 2025, according to projections by U.N. population researchers. By then in Africa, where AIDS likely began and where the virus has wrought the most devastation, researchers said the toll could reach 100 million.

“It is the worst and deadliest epidemic that humankind has ever experienced,” Mark Stirling, the director of East and Southern Africa for UNAIDS, said in an interview.

More effective medicines, better access to treatment and improved prevention in the last few years have started to lower the grim projections. But even if new infections stopped immediately, additional African deaths alone would exceed 40 million, Stirling said.

“We will be grappling with AIDS for the next 10, 20, 30, 50 years,” he said.

Efforts to find an effective vaccine have failed dismally, so far. The International AIDS Vaccine Initiative says 30 are being tested in small-scale trials. More money and more efforts are being poured into prevention campaigns but the efforts are uneven. Success varies widely from region to region, country to country.

Still, science offers some promise. In highly developed countries, cocktails of powerful antiretroviral drugs have largely altered the AIDS prognosis from certain death to a manageable chronic illness.

There is great hope that current AIDS drugs might prevent high-risk people from becoming infected. One of these, tenofovir, is being tested in several countries. Plans are to test it as well with a second drug, emtricitabine or FTC.

But nothing can be stated with certainty until clinical trials are complete, said Anthony Fauci, a leading AIDS researcher and infectious diseases chief at the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

And then there is the risk that treatment will create a resistant strain or, as some critics claim, cause people to lower their guard and have more unprotected sex.

Medicine offers less hope in the developing world where most victims are desperately poor with little or no access to the medical care needed to administer and monitor AIDS drugs. Globally, just 1 in 5 HIV patients get the drugs they need, according to a recent report by UNAIDS, the body leading the worldwide battle against the disease.

Stirling said that despite the advances, the toll over the next 25 years will go far beyond the 34 million thought to have died from the Black Death in 14th century Europe or the 20 to 40 million who perished in the 1918 Spanish flu epidemic.

Almost two-thirds of those infected with HIV live in sub-Saharan Africa where poverty, ignorance and negligent political leadership extended the epidemic’s reach and hindered efforts to contain it. In South Africa, the president once questioned the link between HIV and AIDS and the health minister urged use of garlic and the African potato to fight AIDS, instead of effective treatments.

AIDS is the leading cause of death in Africa, which has accounted for nearly half of all global AIDS deaths. The epidemic is still growing and its peak could be a decade or more away.

In at least seven countries, the U.N. estimates that AIDS has reduced life expectancy to 40 years or less. In Botswana, which has the world’s highest infection rate, a child born today can expect to live less than 30 years.

“Particularly in southern Africa, we may have to apply a new notion, and that is of `underdeveloping’ nations. These are nations which, because of the AIDS epidemic, are going backwards,” Peter Piot, the director of UNAIDS, said in a speech in Washington in March.

Later, at a meeting in Abuja, Nigeria, last month, Piot cited encouraging news including a sharp fall in new infections in some African countries. There also has been an eightfold increase in the number of Africans benefiting from antiretroviral treatment, he said.

But, he warned, “the crisis of AIDS continues and is getting worse and any slackening of our efforts would jeopardize the hard-won gains of each and every one of us.”

Besides the personal suffering of the infected and their families, the epidemic already has had devastating consequences for African education systems, industry, agriculture and economies in general. The impact is magnified because AIDS weakens and kills many young adults, people in their most productive years.

So many farmers and farmworkers have died of AIDS that the U.N. has invented the term “new variant famine.” It means that because of AIDS, the continent will experience persistent famine for generations instead of the usual cycles of hunger tied to variable weather.

Africa’s misery hangs like a sword over Asia, Eastern Europe and the Caribbean.

Researchers don’t expect the infection rates to rival those in Africa. But Asia’s population is so big that even low infection rates could easily translate into tens of millions of deaths.

Although fewer than 1 percent of its people are infected, India has topped South Africa as the country with the most infections, 5.7 million to 5.5 million, according to UNAIDS.

The astonishing numbers have grown from a humble beginning.

Nobody knows for sure when or where, but the AIDS epidemic is thought to have begun in the primeval forests of West Africa when a virus lurking in the blood of a monkey or a chimpanzee made the leap from one species to another, infecting a hunter.

Researchers have found HIV in a blood sample collected in 1959 from a man in Kinshasa, Congo. Genetic analysis of his blood suggested the HIV infection stemmed from a single virus in the late 1940s or early 1950s.

For decades at least, the early human infections went unnoticed on a continent where life routinely is harsh, short and cheap.

Then, on June 5, 1981, the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta reported five young actively homosexual men in Los Angeles had a new, mysterious and as yet unnamed illness that attacked the immune system and caused a type of pneumonia. A month later, it reported an odd surge among homosexual men in the number of cases of Karposi Sarcoma, a rare cancer now linked to AIDS.

In the early days of the epidemic, just the mention of AIDS elicited snickers and jokes. Few saw it as a major threat. It was the “Gay Plague,” and for some, divine retribution for a lifestyle Christian fundamentalists and other conservatives consider deviant and sinful.

When heterosexuals began to contract the disease through blood transfusions and other medical procedures, they were often portrayed as “innocent” victims of a disease spread by the immoral and licentious behavior of others.

The initial reactions and prejudices associated with AIDS slowed the early response to the epidemic and limited the funding. Too much time, money and effort was spent on the wrong priorities, Stirling said.

“Over the last 25 years, the one real weakness was the search for the magic bullet. There is no quick and simple fix,” he said. “But with the recent successes we are starting to see the end of epidemic.”

“There is evidence to suggest we are at the tipping point,” said Stirling.

The pace of change over the last couple of years suggests the number of new infections can be reduced by 50 to 60 percent by 2020 – if the momentum continues.

“It is surely possible, it is doable,” Stirling said.

AP correspondent Mike Stobbe in Atlanta contributed to this report

Copyright 2006 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed

And so on, from the Voice of America Observing a Killer: 25 Years of AIDS, and 25 Million Deaths, by Nancy Steinbach

In nineteen eighty-three, researchers discovered the human immunodeficiency virus as the cause of AIDS. The earliest known H.I.V. infection was found in blood stored since nineteen fifty-nine. The blood came from a man in what is now the capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Kinshasa.

Last week, a team of scientists reported confirmation that H.I.V. came from chimpanzees in the nearby country of Cameroon. The researchers believe the virus passed to humans when hunters came in contact with infected blood. The infection could have crossed borders as people traveled along the Sanaga River and other waterways.

Study leader Beatrice Hahn of the University of Alabama says AIDS may have started in Africa as early as nineteen ten.

to the BBC HIV infections ‘may have peaked’

The rate at which people are infected with HIV may have peaked in the late 1990s, according to a UNAids report.

It found the incidence of new HIV infections appears to have stabilised for the first time in 25 years.

UNAids said improved funding and access to drugs appeared to be producing results – but said HIV remained “an exceptional threat”.

It warned the infection rate was still rising in some countries, and record numbers now live with the virus.

the AIDS meme rules, the inconsistent and irrational narrative it brings amounting to a total breakdown of the brain’s resistance to nonsense. What of the many mainstream studies which now indicate that as might be expected whether you subscribe to the standard theory or not, HIV positivity is not a status that can be transmitted through sex, however exciting, one reason being that antibodies are not contagious, by definition?

How precisely is it that professional reporters of the medical standing of Larry Altman are unable to make themselves aware of what any lowly blog writer with access to PubMed can discover in three minutes?

Her speech steered away from many of the criticisms that have been leveled against the administration, notably that it promotes sexual abstinence over scientifically proven strategies, particularly condom use. Indeed, she said, the “ABC” model — the initials stand for abstain, be faithful and use condoms — had brought sharp declines in infections in Africa.

It is, without question, the power of the meme.

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